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A story that
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A rich history of
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OUR HISTORY
1317

First cane sugar in Europe

No sugar was produced in Europe until the 19th century.

Sugar was extracted solely from sugar cane which only grew only in distant tropical countries, consequently sugar became synonymous with import by sea.

The port of Antwerp played an important part in this. History books tell us that Venetian galleys brought cane sugar cargoes to the banks of the Scheldt for the very first time in 1317.

1500

Origin of the Suikerrui

Sugar processing in Antwerp expanded from the beginning of the 16th century.

The route between the quayside and the Grote Markt (the main market at that time) soon became known as Suikerrui (Sugar Canal) and was the lifeline for more than a hundred confectioners.

The appearance of Suikerrui changed several times over the centuries. Entire blocks of houses were demolished, the canal was covered and the bridges removed. Even the name Suikerrui is historically only partly correct.

The name was given to part of the present Suikerrui only in 1530, and referred to the stretch between Pieter Potstraat and Hoogstraat. The other side between Gildekamerstraat and Kaasstraat was called Zoutrui (Salt Canal), and further down to the Scheldt, it was called Boterrui (Butter Canal).

It was not until 1893 that the name Suikerrui was given to the whole street. The town council chose the name because the street was home to several confectioners and sugar boilers at the time.

1508

First Refinery: Candy sugar is a luxury product

Cane sugar was imported in very unrefined form at the time.

Cane sugar melted at high temperatures was converted into candy sugar by crystallisation.

The first refinery in Antwerp was established in 1508, and by 1550 there were more than fifteen sugar manufacturers. By then, Antwerp had grown into one of the most important sugar processing centres in Europe.

Candy sugar was initially a luxury because it was a craft product made on a small scale. In the beginning it was traditionally given to royalty or important visitors such as the German painter Albrecht Dürer, when he stayed in Antwerp for a year in 1520.

1648

Treaty of Munster

Antwerp remained the largest sugar processing centre in the world until the late 17th century.

Antwerp's great wealth dwindled, however, after the city was cut off from the sea by the disastrous Treaty of Munster, which closed the Scheldt to shipping. Many refineries closed down when the raw material had to be brought to Antwerp from Ostend in small boats.

1806

Continental blockade

The importation of goods from overseas was completely paralysed during the Napoleonic Wars as a result of the Continental Blockade.

Products such as coffee and cane sugar were the first to suffer. As a countermeasure, Napoleon encouraged the cultivation of chicory and sugar beet on the continent.

The sugar industry moved further away from the port so as to be closer to the inland production areas of sugar beet. In addition, new sugar refining methods were developed that were much faster and less costly. The candy sugar industry suffered badly, and many companies closed down.

1884

Revival of the Antwerp sugar industry

Cane sugar made a major return to Antwerp after the Continental Blockade was lifted, and candy sugar processing underwent a revival.

At the end of the 19th century, there were some forty sugar refineries in Antwerp, fifteen of which also refined raw beet sugar. Antwerp was on its way to becoming a global centre for sugar again.

In 1884, Antwerp had seventeen sugar refineries, most of which continued to be sufficiently profitable until the First World War.

1948

Five candy sugar refineries form a syndicate

There were only fourteen sugar refineries left in Antwerp after the First World War.

The decline accelerated even more after the Second World War. In 1948 the five remaining candy sugar producers decided to join forces in the "Syndicat des Raffineurs Candisiers de Belgique", the Syndicate of Belgian Candy Sugar Refiners.Four of them had already founded the co-operative association of Candico in 1935 to protect their commercial interests and to set up a joint export office.

The market, however, turned out to be too small to guarantee the continued existence of five candy sugar refineries, which meant that only Candico survived.

1969

Raffima

As the demand for candy sugar products declined, Raffima NV (Raffinaderij Merksem Antwerpen) – one of the few remaining candy sugar works – was taken over by Sucres de Tirlemont.

This company joined forces with Raffinaderij Peten and Kandijfabriek Hens en Herssens to become CANDICO nv.

1970

From local to global production

Consolidation was completed in 1970 by the takeover of the Valère Verfaillie candy sugar refinery in Merksem and the Candiserie of Ath.

Subsequent major strategic steps were taken in the following years: by acquiring candy sugar production units in a number of neighbouring countries (the United Kingdom, the Netherlands and France), Candico grew into the leading candy sugar producer in Europe and even the entire world.

Using continually modernised production equipment, today's candy sugar products are still manufactured according to the same longstanding tradition in order to guarantee their authentic quality and flavour.

2002

Fair trade

Over the years, Candico has built solid relationships with various producers from South Africa and South America, which have led to structured and strict quality guidelines.

In 2002, Candico was registered as an importer of Fair trade cane sugar.

2005

Recognised local product

Candy sugar is produced at Candico according to a longstanding tradition.

Candico's years of tradition and expertise in processing beet sugar in candy sugar products proved fruitful when in 2005, its candy sugar products were recognised as "local products", which means that they meet the strict requirements to bear the official local product label.

IN THE 16TH CENTURY SUGAR WAS SCARCE AND CONSIDERED A LUXURY. BEING SO RARE AND EXCLUSIVE, IT WAS EVEN GIVEN AS A GIFT TO ROYALTY.

CANE SUGAR

Produced since the first cargos of sugar cane arrived on the banks of the Scheldt in 1317.

Raw cane sugar cubes
Raw cane sugar cubes
Raw cane icing sugar
Raw cane icing sugar
White caster sugar
White caster sugar
Raw organic cane sugar cubes
Raw organic cane sugar cubes
Raw organic cane sugar
Raw organic cane sugar

For gourmets with a rough edge.

A cube of 100% unrefined cane sugar to enjoy every day. The unrefined cane sugar cubes tempt by their authentic appearance and delicious, typical cane sugar flavour. Through years of experience and tradition, Candico guarantees you the best quality in each cube of cane sugar.

This product with the Max Havelaar label supports fair trade.

1 kg and 500 grs.

Give your baking an exotic tint.

With its authentic taste of 100% pure cane sugar, its fine and sparkling crystals and light golden colour, this product gives a distinct character to your tarts, cakes, pastries and 'exotic' drinks. 

Through years of experience and tradition, Candico guarantees you the best- quality cane sugar.

This product with the Max Havelaar label supports fair trade.

1 kg.

Give your recipes an exotic touch.

With its fine grains and white colour, this refined cane sugar adds a touch of exoticism to your desserts and baked goods. Thanks to its long-established tradition and experience, Candico guarantees the best quality cane sugar. 

This product with the Max Havelaar label supports fair trade.

1 kg.

For organic gourmets.

A cube of 100% unrefined organic cane sugar to enjoy every day. The organic logo allows you to be confident that the sugar comes from certified organic agriculture.

Only natural manures, soil conditioners and crop protection methods are used. Products such as synthetic fertilisers and pesticides are banned.

This guarantees optimal retention of the food value and the authentic taste of cane sugar. What is more, by choosing organic cane sugar, you are saving the environment and your own body from harmful substances.

Be surprised by organic cane sugar.

Your tarts and pastries and other recipes will taste even richer thanks to the special flavour and aroma of this sugar.The organic logo allows you to be confident that the sugar comes from certified organic agriculture.

Only natural manures, soil conditioners and crop protection methods are used. Products such as synthetic fertilisers and pesticides are banned.

This guarantees optimal retention of the food value and the authentic taste of cane sugar. What's more, by choosing organic cane sugar you are saving the environment and your own body from harmful substances.

WE HAVE BEEN PRODUCING OFFICIALLY CERTIFIED, ORGANIC SUGAR CANE FOR OVER 20 YEARS.

CANDY SUGAR

Created with care and the greatest respect for tradition.

Light brown soft sugar
Light brown soft sugar
Candy sugar
Candy sugar
Brown soft sugar
Brown soft sugar
Candy syrup
Candy syrup

Delicious taste of the past.

Enjoy the delicious taste of the past to the fullest. This brown sugar is produced with craftsmanship and respect for tradition. Superb for caramelising dishes. Try giving your dishes a hint of gastronomic refinement with its soft texture and beautiful golden colour.

Available in 500g and 1kg packets.

Enjoy this amber coloured candy to the fullest.

Spoil yourself with these brown 8-15 mm crystals The exceptional purity and fineness of its candy crystals make this sugar ideal for numerous uses. Try something new by using this candy sugar in your tea, cappuccino, mocha, ristretto, mulled wine, Irish coffee and much more...

Available in 250g and 500g packets.

Delicious taste of the past.

Enjoy the delicious taste of the past to the fullest. This brown sugar is produced with craftsmanship and respect for tradition. Superb for caramelising dishes. Try giving your dishes a hint of gastronomic refinement with its soft texture and beautiful brown colour.

Available in 500g and 1kg packets.

A nostalgic moment.

Take a chance to enjoy a moment of pure tradition. Enjoy the delicious syrups of the past.

Use as a spread or topping on pancakes, ice creams, yogurt or other desserts. This syrup's flavour will continually surprise you and forms the perfect partner for enhancing a wide choice of recipes and ingredients, both savoury and sweet 

The strong dark candy syrup is distinguished from the mild, light candy syrup by its flavour and a small difference in colour.

400g.

WE WERE THE FIRST BELGIAN COMPANY TO MAKE ITS ENTIRE RANGE OF CANE SUGARS FAIRTRADE.

FLEMISH BEEF STEW COOKED IN BEER
FLEMISH BEEF STEW COOKED IN BEER
CHICKEN STICKS
CHICKEN STICKS
THAI SALAD WITH BEEF
THAI SALAD WITH BEEF
FRIED CHICKEN WINGS
FRIED CHICKEN WINGS
Flemish beef stew cooked in beer

Flemish beef stew cooked in beer

PREPARATION
20 min
COOKING
1 hour 30 min
SERVES
4

INGREDIENTS

1.5 kg of stew meat

50 g of brown candy sugar

7.5 dl of beer

20 g of mustard

1 clove

1 bay leaf

METHOD

Sauté the meat and season with a spice mix for stews.

Slice the onions into rings, sauté, sprinkle in the brown candy sugar and allow to caramelise.

Add the meat and moisten with the beer. Add the mustard, clove and bay leaf.

Cook until tender and season to taste. Thicken with a little flour or a roux if you wish.

Chicken livers skewers

Chicken livers skewers

PREPARATION
20 mins
COOKING
25 min
SERVES
4

INGREDIENTS

125 g of chicken livers

1 apple (Jonagold)

1 tablespoon of candy sugar

pinch of ground ginger

25 g of baking butter

pepper

salt

METHOD

Clean and rinse the chicken livers carefully. Cut into cubes, season with salt and pepper and fry in hot butter until cooked through.

A couple of minutes before they are ready add the apples (cored and cut into rough chunks), dust with ground ginger and candy sugar.

Remove a piece of apple followed by a piece of chicken liver from the pan with a fork and alternate them on the skewers.

Serve immediately.

Thai salad with beef

Thai salad with beef

PREPARATION
15 min + 2hrs resting time
COOKING
10 min
SERVES
2

INGREDIENTS

1 top quality beef steak of about 200 gram

1 clove of garlic

1 red Thai chilli pepper

Cane sugar

Soy sauce

Light oil (sesame is ideal but light olive oil also works well)

1 shallot

1 spring onion

1 piece of cucumber 10 cm long

1 lemon

Fresh mint

Fresh coriander

Salt

METHOD

Start with the marinade for the meat: finely slice the garlic and the chilli pepper. Mix with one tablespoon of cane sugar, one tablespoon of oil, one tablespoon of light soy sauce, a pinch of salt and the juice of half a lemon. Slice up the steak very thinly (carpaccio-style) and leave to marinade for at least 30 minutes. One or two hours is ideal.

Peel the cucumber, cut it in half across and then cut into fine slices. Peel the shallot and slice into wafer-thin (almost transparent) slices. Mix with 10-15 fresh mint leaves and a handful of finely chopped coriander.

Grill or bake meat until cooked through. Allow it to cool slightly before mixing it into the salad. Add a little of the meat juices and marinade as a dressing. Add a few sesame seeds or finely chopped peanuts if you wish.

Fried chicken wings

Fried chicken wings

PREPARATION
15 min + 30 min resting time
COOKING
10 min
SERVES
6-8

INGREDIENTS

24 chicken wings

6 shallots

10 tablespoons of soy sauce

6 cl of dry sherry

1 tablespoon of candy sugar

Pepper

2 teaspoons of cornflour

25 g of baking butter

METHOD

Prepare a marinade with the soy sauce, sherry, pepper and sugar and marinade the chicken wings for half an hour.

Spread out on kitchen paper and dust with cornflour.

Deep-fry until golden brown.

Remove from the fryer and leave to drain on kitchen paper.

Sprinkle with the chopped shallots that you have sautéd in butter.

'SPECULOOS' COOKIES
'SPECULOOS' COOKIES
NECTARINE JAM
NECTARINE JAM
MOJITO
MOJITO
CRÉME BRÛLÉE
CRÉME BRÛLÉE
'Speculoos' cookies

'Speculoos' cookies

PREPARATION
30 min
COOKING
10-30 min
SERVES
Makes 48 cookies

INGREDIENTS

400 g of flour

2.5 teaspoons of baking powder

1.5 teaspoons of mixed spice for ‘speculoos’

200 g of butter

250 g of dark brown soft sugar

75 g of almonds flakes

METHOD

Mix and sieve the flour with the baking powder, mixed spice and the salt.

Add the dark brown soft sugar and cold butter.

Knead into an elastic dough and then leave to stand overnight. This allows the aroma of the spices to penetrate the dough.

If you have a ‘speculoos’ mould, dust it with flour and press in pieces of dough. Otherwise roll out the dough and cut out cookies.

Place the cookies on a buttered baking tray scattered with almond flakes.

Bake in a warm oven (160 °C) until cooked through and browned.

Nectarine jam

Nectarine jam

PREPARATION
30 min + 1 hour resting time
COOKING
45 min
SERVES
4

INGREDIENTS

1 kg of nectarines

500 g of sugar with pectin Extra-Fruit 2+1

1 lemon

METHOD

Wash the nectarines, cut them into pieces and remove the stones.

Mix the nectarines with the sugar and the juice of the lemon.

Leave this mixture for 1 hour to draw out the flavour.

Bring the mixture to the boil.

Boil for 45 minutes (calculate the cooking time from the moment that the bubbles no longer disappear when you stir the mixture).

Mojito

Mojito

PREPARATION
20 min
COOKING
No cooking time
SERVES
1

INGREDIENTS

60 ml of Havana Club Rum

1 to 2 lemons

3 sprigs of mint

1 to 2 teaspoons of caster sugar

5 ice cubes

Ice-cold soda water

METHOD

Pour the rum into a medium tall tumbler.

Wash the lemon, cut it in half and cut one half into 4 segments.

Add 3 lemon segments to the rum in the glass.

Add the leaves from 2 mint sprigs to the rum in the glass.

Add the sugar.

Squeeze the lemon and the mint in the glass with a pestle or stir vigorously with a spoon.

Add the ice cubes and top up with soda water.

Decorate the edge of the glass with the fourth lemon segment.

Stick the third sprig of mint into the glass to decorate.

Crème brûlée with 'speculoos'

Crème brûlée with 'speculoos'

PREPARATION
15 mins + cooling
COOKING
30 min
SERVES
4

INGREDIENTS

4 level tablespoons of Candico light brown soft sugar

30 g of castor sugar (‘Tiense Suiker’)

80 g of ‘speculoos’

50 cl of full-cream milk

4 egg yolks

METHOD

Heat the oven to 5 – 150 °C.

Beat the egg yolks with the castor sugar to a pale frothy mixture.

Melt the crumbled ‘speculoos’ in half of the milk on a low heat until completely melted. Add the rest of the milk, pour this mixture over the eggs and mix.

Divide the mixture over 4 crème brûlee dishes (or 4 soufflé dishes). Put them in a large oven-proof tray and fill it with warm water to ¾ way up the small dishes. Leave to bake for 30 min. Leave to completely cool and then place in the fridge for a few hours.

Just before serving cover the crèmes with a fine layer of soft brown sugar and caramelise with a crème brûlée torch or under a hot grill (if using the grill, place ice cubes around the dishes). Wait 5 min and serve.

WE'RE COMMITTED TO TRADITION, WHICH MEANS OUR CANDY SUGARS ARE CERTIFIED REGIONAL PRODUCTS.